Make your own free website on Tripod.com
QUESTIONS & ANSWERS

Used by permission from Durty Dan.
Copyright Durty Dan 1995, all rights reserved.
Any reproduction without expressed permision by the author is strickly prohibited.
This information is altered in part from its original format

# 1 - WHAT SHOULD I DO BEFORE EVERY GAME?
# 2 - WHAT IS TARGET FIXATION OR TUNNEL VISION AND WHY IS IT TO BE AVOIDED?
# 3 - COVER AND CONCEALMENT, THEY RE THE SAME THINGS, AREN T THEY?
# 4 - WHAT S THE BEST WAY TO MOVE (WHEN I M NOT BEING SHOT AT)?
# 5 - WHAT S THE BEST WAY TO MOVE (WHEN I AM BEING SHOT AT)?
# 6 - IS THERE A PROPER WAY TO RETREAT?
# 7 - WHAT ARE THE SIMPLEST TEAM OFFENSIVE TACTICS?
# 8 - WHAT ARE THE SIMPLEST TEAM DEFENSIVE TACTICS?
# 9 - WHAT ARE SOME OF THE THINGS WE SHOULD BE DOING WHEN WE HAVE THE OPPOSITION S FLAG?
# 10 - WHAT ARE SOME OF THE THINGS WE SHOULD BE DOING IF THE OPPOSITION HAS OUR FLAG?
# 11 - IN A WALK-ON SITUATION, HOW CAN YOU EASILY ASSESS THE APTITUDE OF A POTENTIAL OPPONENTS/TEAM MATES, BEFORE THE GAMES START?
# 12 - HOW DO I MOVE QUICKLY AND STILL NOT MAKE A LOT OF NOISE?
# 13 - WHAT ARE SOME OF THE BETTER METHODS I CAN USE TO MAKE MY GAME BETTER?
# 14 - HOW IN THE HELL AM I SUPPOSED TO REMEMBER ALL OF THIS!!!!


INTRODUCTION

Okay, I ll warn you right now, this has got to be the largest FAQ in Cyberpaintball history. (2032 words according to my spell checker.) It s just that I have a lot to tell you. Most of the information is taken from my articles. Most of which were written from personal experience (especially the FAQ about how to retreat). Anyway, don t read it now, down load it and spend some time going through it.


# 1 - WHAT SHOULD I DO BEFORE EVERY GAME?

1. Make sure your paintgun is loaded, the CO2 is on and it's cocked and ready to fire.
2. Check your goggles and make sure the strap is secure on the frames and check to ensure the lenses are properly in place. Make sure they re clean.
3. Make sure you have your squeegee.
4. Check to see of your tubes or bulk loaders are topped up.
5. When you get out to the flag station, remember to take your barrel plug out.


# 2 - WHAT IS TARGET FIXATION OR TUNNEL VISION AND WHY IS IT TO BE AVOIDED?

Do not get target fixation. This is best described as forgetting everyone else on the field, except the player you have in your sights. Keep your head up and look around. This includes looking behind you, from time to time.


# 3 - COVER AND CONCEALMENT, THEY'RE THE SAME THINGS, AREN'T THEY?

No they are not the same thing. Think of it this way. Cover: it will stop a paintball, but will not hide you. A pane of glass, for instance.
Concealment: it will allow you to hide, but may not stop a paintball. A wall of paper is a good example.
Most times, you'll get both. Don't rely on it, one hundred percent of the time. Just remember, the bush may hide you, but it might not stop a paintball.


# 4 - WHAT S THE BEST WAY TO MOVE (WHEN I M NOT BEING SHOT AT)?

Unless the other team knows where you are (indicated by the fact that they're shooting at you) take your time. The faster you move, the more noise you're going to make. If you have the time, take it. You can have speed, or silence, but not both. You'll know when to use one or the other. See also # 12.


# 5 - WHAT S THE BEST WAY TO MOVE (WHEN I AM BEING SHOT AT)?

The idea is to move as fast as possible, in short bursts, to prevent your opponent from drawing a bead on you. As a rule of thumb, it takes about three seconds for a person to recognize, acquire, sight in and shoot at a target that pops up unexpectedly. You don't want to give them three seconds. You also don't want to "telegraph" your movement. When you're ready to go, then GO! Don't try a "head fake", or any fancy stuff like that. You're robbing yourself of your three second advantage.


# 6 - IS THERE A PROPER WAY TO RETREAT?

RETREAT ?!?!? NOT! Let's try the word WITHDRAWAL. The difference is that a retreat is an every- player-for-themselves scenario. A withdrawal is simply an advance, in the opposite direction. (No, that's not a joke, smarty pants.) When you have to get out, you should still be moving from cover to cover, returning fire and all the stuff you do when you're attacking in the forward direction.
Turning and running is for cowards and the unskilled. Besides, when all else fails, remember Durty Dan's Law of Paintball
# 2: "Never give up, never say die, fight to the end, and take as many of the bastards with you, when you go!"


# 7 - WHAT ARE THE SIMPLEST TEAM OFFENSIVE TACTICS?

Okay, these are really simple. They are, however, as effective as they are simplistic.
1. First, you should designate a small group of players to act as a flanking party. These players will automatically break off and flank the opposition when you encounter them. If you designate specific players to do this before the game, you don't have worry about confusion on who is going to go DURING the game. I remember being up front and saying "A couple of you flank around." When I turned around, they were ALL gone flanking! The Flanking party should stay to the back, so they don't get hit during initial contact.
2. It's also wise to stay in one group. If you break up into smaller groups, the opposition will eliminate them quickly, if they were smart enough to stay in a group.
3. The best way to win is to avoid the opposition altogether. It's fun to shoot your friends, but if you want to win, you'll want as many people as you can get into the flag station.
4. When you get to the flag station, send your flanking party around to the other side to divert attention. Once the defenders start moving and advancing on the flankers, you rush in and shoot a few butts. This only works if the defenders don't see the main body.


# 8 - WHAT ARE THE SIMPLEST TEAM DEFENSIVE TACTICS?

Defenders are only there to slow down the opposition. By definition, they are DEFENDING, not stopping. The longer you can slow down the opposition, the better it will be for your attackers. You should only have a few defenders, and those who will not break and run at the first sign of trouble. Incidentally, the most tenacious defenders I've ever gone up against have been women. I don't know why, but they're more determined than their male team mates. (That doesn't mean you should leave the ladies on defence all day, guys.)


# 9 - WHAT ARE SOME OF THE THINGS WE SHOULD BE DOING WHEN WE HAVE THE OPPOSITION S FLAG?

Everyone makes the same mistake. You grab the flag and you take off, leaving the opponent's flag station empty. What happens if they have YOUR flag and they're halfway back. They're going to hang the flag while you're still huffin' and puffin' down the trail. Leave a few players back to give the opposition a little surprise, and give you a little more time to get to your flag station. When you get to your flag station, make sure it's clear, the bad guys may have read this too. Don't let the guy who grabs the flag run off half cocked. Make sure there are a few players in front of him and a few players behind. Most times the opposition doesn't realize you have their flag until you pass them. Now they're behind you, which is why you have a few players taking up the rear. No matter what:
NEVER LEAVE THE OPPOSITION S FLAG STATION UNATTENDED.


# 10 - WHAT ARE SOME OF THE THINGS WE SHOULD BE DOING IF THE OPPOSITION HAS OUR FLAG?

Where are they going to go with your flag? That's right, THEIR flag station. Don't try to second guess which route they're going to take back. Beat feet to their flag station and wait for them there. They usually come running in, thinking (and acting) like they already won. Then, you let them have it!


# 11 - IN A WALK-ON SITUATION, HOW CAN YOU EASILY ASSESS THE APTITUDE OF A POTENTIAL OPPONENTS/TEAM MATES, BEFORE THE GAMES START?

Here s Durty Dan s Basic Lesson of Separating the Badasses from the Smartasses (This is where tournament players have the advantage. You can't play in the tournament circuit and expect not to know what you're going to be up against. Sizing up your opposition is as simple as reading the team stats (wins, losses, placings, amateur/pro). However, we're not all tournament players.

1. CLOTHING
Some people suggest you look for faded cammies and well worn clothing. Not!
Players are buying new cammies all the time. Look for old patches on new cammies. Most time when teams get patches made, they get a limited number, by the time their cammies wear out, they've traded all their extra patches and have to take the ones off their old set of cammies and put them on their new set. Still, this is not a reliable indication. The best way is to check out their footwear. Footwear is something that is personal. Once you break in a pair of boots or runners, you're hard pressed to throw them away until they're falling apart. There's something sentimental and downright comfortable about a good old pair of broken in runners or boots. They may have new cammies, but their boots may just tell you how long they've been playing. Don't automatically think that if a player is wearing those "tournament jammies" that he's a pro. He could be one a TWiBs (tournament wanna be), and buying things the "pros use".

2. EQUIPMENT
Again, most people will tell you to look at their harnesses for wear and paint stains. This is good, but limited. Check out their loader pots in their harness. If you've been playing for a while, you'll eventually lose one or two loaders. Look for a mix of old AND new loaders. Players may get new hoppers for their paintguns, but a loader can be used for almost any hopper on any paintgun. They'll keep the loaders, no matter how many new hoppers they have.

3. ATTITUDE
Are they bragging about past glories? Are they regaling their friends with amazing tales of daring do? Look for the players who are NOT talking paintball. They guys and gals who are discussing last night's TV movie or what happened at the office/job sight since they last spoke are the ones to watch out for. They don't need to impress anyone, they are secure enough in their playing abilities not to have to resort to "psyching-out" the opposition.

4. ACTIONS
How long does it take them to get ready? The experienced players seem to sit down, unpack, kit-up and sit to wait for everyone else to get ready. Also, experienced players will have everything they need for the day. They won't be bothering buddies for bug spray, paper towels, tools or other things.

5. SAFETY
Do they practice safety? Again, experienced players will be safe, as a matter of course. You'll also notice that experienced players will also "prompt" other players to be safe, as well. You'll hear experienced players say things like, "You forgot your barrel plug." or "Goggles on."

6. THE PAINT PER GAME LOAD
How much paint are they carrying on them? Are they loaded for bear? Do they have an 800 round hopper on their paintgun? If they're carrying all that paint for a routine game of capture the flag, they're intending to use it. This is NOT an indication of skill, by any means. On the recreational level, it is a definite indication of LACK of skill. You may have to shoot a lot of paint at the Masters in the finals, but not at Trippsan Falls Paintball Field in a pick-up game.
BEWARE the player who is only carrying a couple of hundred rounds on them. They don't NEED a whole lot of paint to take a player out, so they don't bring it.

7. HANDLING THEIR EQUIPMENT
How familiar are they with their equipment? Are they fumbling about? Are they having problems with little things (finding the safety on their paintgun, unsure of how to put something together, fumbling with loaders or harnesses)? Or do they look like they could load, shoot and maybe even play with their eyes closed?

8. WHAT NOT TO LOOK AT
Their paintgun is not a good indicator. It could be rented, borrowed or purchased second hand. A new paintgun does not indicate a newer player any more than an old paintgun indicates an experienced player.

9. WHO TO FEAR THE MOST
There is one player to avoid at ALL costs: The player who is NOT wearing camouflage, is playing with twelve grams and a pump paintgun (or worse a stockgun) and ten round tubes. This, despite the fact that everyone else is carrying semis. If this same player was ready 30 minutes before everyone else, and if the player just mentions once that they've played with oil based paint, years ago, when they first started playing -- pray you're on their side.


# 12 - HOW DO I MOVE QUICKLY AND STILL NOT MAKE A LOT OF NOISE?

I have little respect for players who stomp around in the woods, like a moose in rutting season, or players who make more noise than a travelling mariachi band. There are ways to reduce your personal noise signature.
1. FOOTWEAR
Soft soled foot wear, like running shoes, are ideal for paintball. "Army" boots may look cool, but they make too much noise. Soft soled footwear, with proper ankle support, have a natural sound absorbtion property that hard soled combat boots do not.
2. SHAKE, RATTLE AND ROLL
Half filled loaders in your harness rattle unmercifully. There is a way around this. Your loader tube's capacity should be half of your paintgun's hopper capacity. You see if you have a 100 round hopper and 100 round tubes, you're going to have to run the hopper dry before you can reload. Why? It's simple, if you don't, you're going to have extra paint left in the tube. THAT'S what is going to rattle. I try to stick to loaders which are half the capacity of the hopper. That way, you completely empty the tube. Padding the tops of your bulk tubes also helps. You can buy precut foam inserts, however with some thin, closed cell foam, a pair of scissors and some double sided carpet tape, you can make your own. Putting a neoprene cover on your hopper will reduce the sound of paintballs rattling around. Also, the thicker the hopper walls are, the less noise rattle paintballs will make. However, if you play stock, you don't have to worry about that, do you?
3. HAVE A FIT
Harnesses, holsters and other things should be snug, but not restrictive. Try to keep any pouches, in which you intend to keep paint, away from your legs, especially the fronts of your legs. When you walk and run, if there are pouches near your legs, they going to move (and subsequently rattle). If you just have a belt, with some pouches on it (like I do), make sure the belt loops on the pouches are closer to the centre of the pouch. If the loops are near the top, the pouch will have a tendency to flap around more than if the loops were closer to the centre of the pouch. You can either buy new pouches, or re-sew the loops of your existing pouches into the proper position. The belt should be as wide as the loops on the pouches will allow. Any extra space will alow the pouches to move more.
4. SOFT CLOTHING
Coarse fabrics, like brand new cammies, will make a lot of noise when you brush against branches and foliage. Use a fabric softener when you wash your cammies, or what ever you play in. Try to stay away from rough feeling fabrics, I find cotton, especially the type found in sweat shirts, is the most quiet.
5. MOVING
Stick to paths and uncluttered surfaces if you have to move quickly. The faster you move, the more noise you're going to make. You can't have it both ways. If you have time, take it.


# 13 - WHAT ARE SOME OF THE BETTER METHODS I CAN USE TO MAKE MY GAME BETTER?

First, let me share the basic premise of my revelation with you. I have found that the only way to get better, in any sport, is to play against someone better than you are at that particular sport.
Playing with more experienced players offers more of a challenge. We, as a species, seem to perform better when faced with a challenge. (For the most part.) When you play with players who have comparable skill levels, that challenge is diminished.
Therefore, if you want your game to improve, you must put yourself at a disadvantage. When at a disadvantage with your peer group, you must try harder, because that disadvantage creates a challenge.
So how do you give yourself a disadvantage, apart from tethering yourself to a tree, wearing an anvil or painting your goggle lenses black? There are several ways.
In the past two years, I've been playing with a semi. The paintgun is accurate and has greater range, at the same velocity, than other semis. I've been playing at the same technological level as everyone else. Where's the challenge?
1. BECOME TECHNOLOGICALLY DISADVANTAGED

a. Last year, I made an "old fashioned" stick feeder for my semi. It holds twenty-three paintballs, and it must be loaded with ten shot tubes. There's the first way to Technologically Disadvantage (TD) yourself. Limit your paint expenditure (by carrying less paint) or limit the amount of paint you can put into your paintgun. This way, you'll make every shot count, and you'll HAVE to manoeuvre to get a good shot.

b. The second way to TD yourself, is to play with a pump paintgun. Although I love my semi, I've been using it with less frequency. Armed with my trusty pump action marker, I routinely go up against players armed with semis. For further challenges, I mount a stick feed on it and run it on 12 grams. I also use my Sheridan based stock class marker when playing against semis.

c. There's the third way, limit your power source. Use 12 grams instead of constant air.

2. CHANGE YOUR STYLE

a. Another way to improve your game is to do things you normally wouldn't do. I'm not a "lone wolf" player. I prefer to work as a back-up or a flanker, with another player. When the opportunity arises, I try to strike out on my own and do a little stalking. I'm not as good as I want to be (I'm like a fish out of water) but I'm getting better at it. That's the main objective.

b. Purposely going up against multiple opponents, when you're alone (or by yourself) helps a lot, too. The first few encounters will be VERY one sided, but after a while, you'll get better at it. HOWEVER . . .
you can read a million tactics articles. You can do thousands of drills. You can sit around and discuss tactics until you're blue in the face. You'll NEVER get better. There is only one way to get better at your game than you are now. This is true, and applies to everyone, from the first-time player to the first place tournament team. You have to play. You have to play a lot. Look at other sports. You can do lay-ups, one-on-one drills, slam your body into a padded upright, do kata, slap pucks into the net. These ARE essential, but they do not replace actual playing. Why? A drill is a structured scenario. It is designed to put you in a position where the situation is ideal to the purpose of the drill. It is predictable and regimented. Actual play is not. It is the challenge of the natural randomness of actual play that makes improvements. That's why professional sports teams run "scrimmages". Teams divide and play against themselves. This is good, but it still does not take the place of actual play. Even Bob Long, the leading advocate of team drills, will tell you that you HAVE to play. Think about it. If all you did was do your forms, shadow-box, and hit the speed bag, how well do you think you'd do when you got toe-to-toe with an opponent? You'd be kissing canvas, that's how you'd do. Recreational or tournament player, if you want to improve you game, you have to PLAY it. Play as much as your schedule and your budget will allow. There is no substitution.


# 14 - HOW IN THE HELL AM I SUPPOSED TO REMEMBER ALL OF THIS !!!!

I know, there is a lot of stuff to remember, and everyone has an opinion. The game is very complex, and it takes time to master the intricacies. However, there are ten tips that will help you with your first game. Here are ten simple tips entitled: DURTY DAN S KWIK-AND-DURTY TOP TEN TIP LIST (First say it ten times fast, without a mistake. If you still don t need medical attention to untie your tongue, read on.)
TIP # 1
Follow all safety rules. Do not fire your paintgun in camp, for ANY REASON. Do not remove your goggles in the playing area for ANY REASON.

TIP # 2
Don't stay in one place too long. The key to the game is movement. Try to plan your next move, before you actually move. However, if you do decide to lay in ambush for someone, keep absolutely still. Movement will defeat the best camouflage.

TIP # 3
Don't stand behind someone when they're being shot at. There's a good chance you're going to be hit with the paintballs that missed the player you're standing behind.

TIP # 4
Don't ever lie down. Crouch or kneel, otherwise it takes too long for you to get back up again. I find "going to ground" is a habit most associated with people who have had military training. Sometimes you have to crawl, but for the most part, stay on your feet.

TIP # 5
Don't forget to check over your shoulder.

TIP # 6
Spend some time on the target range. Learn to and operate the paintgun you're going to operate.

TIP # 7
If possible, play with someone who is patient, who will point out what you did right, and who will offer constructive criticism when you do something wrong.

TIP # 8
When defending the flag, you should be away from the flag, so when you are pressured by the opposition, you have some room to move back, to prevent from being out-flanked. You should also not be disappointed if the opposition does get the flag. If you've managed to hold them off for even a couple of minutes, you've done your job. I might point out that you are a flag DEFENDER, not a flag KEEPER. No one ever said you had to keep the flag, just defend it.

TIP # 9
Don't be afraid to surrender. If you are vastly outnumbered, you've been cornered, or you're in any no-win situation -- its okay to give up. Besides, it's painless!

TIP # 10
Don't get discouraged. Every paintball player in the world, no matter how good they are, started out as newbies. They just forget it, sometimes.


Tactics Page Main Page